You have no items in your shopping cart.
Close
Search
Filters

Divide and Ruin: The West's imperial strategy in an age of crisis / Dan Glazebrook

Availability: In stock
Paperback
£8.50
This product has a minimum quantity of 2
Divide and Ruin: The West’s Imperial Strategy in an Age of Crisis is a collection of articles by British author Dan Glazebrook. Originally published by Counterpunch, Z Magazine, the Guardian, the Independent and Asia Times amongst others, these writings illustrate a new strategy deployed by U.S., British and other Western powers following the failure of the Iraq war to stabilise Western hegemony. This strategy employs proxy military forces to foment sectarian division and civil war - backed where possible by brutal aerial bombardment – against any independent regional power deemed a threat to Western strategic and economic imperatives. Glazebrook shows the brutality of the West’s racist and exploitative foreign policy against the global South, citing examples from Libya, Syria, and elsewhere in the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and exploring in detail the role of AFRICOM as an imperialist force operating on that continent. Economic and social issues in Britain also come under scrutiny, including an analysis of race and racism in the urban youth uprisings of 2011.
Divide and Ruin: The West’s Imperial Strategy in an Age of Crisis is a collection of articles by British author Dan Glazebrook. Originally published by Counterpunch, Z Magazine, the Guardian, the Independent and Asia Times amongst others, these writings illustrate a new strategy deployed by U.S., British and other Western powers following the failure of the Iraq war to stabilise Western hegemony. This strategy employs proxy military forces to foment sectarian division and civil war - backed where possible by brutal aerial bombardment – against any independent regional power deemed a threat to Western strategic and economic imperatives. Glazebrook shows the brutality of the West’s racist and exploitative foreign policy against the global South, citing examples from Libya, Syria, and elsewhere in the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and exploring in detail the role of AFRICOM as an imperialist force operating on that continent. Economic and social issues in Britain also come under scrutiny, including an analysis of race and racism in the urban youth uprisings of 2011.