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April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Death And How It Changed America / Michael Eric Dyson

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Used - Very Good Hardback
£9.99

Michael Eric Dyson re-examines the influence of the famous Civil Rights leader, and how his death changed America. Martin Luther King, Jr, the prophet for racial and economic justice in America, was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Earlier that day, he had ended his final public speech by saying "I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the Promised Land."Now, forty years after his death, Michael Eric Dyson uses the assassination as a starting point for a comprehensive re-evaluation of the fate of America, specifically Black America, over the ensuing years. He ambitiously - and controversially - investigates the ways in the nation has made it to the Promised Land (the Civil Rights Bill of '64; the incredible number of black elected; the expanding black middle class and increased numbers of black entrepreneurs and CEOs) whilst shining a bright light on the many areas that still fall far short (racial profiling; police brutality; housing discrimination in the form of mortgage practices; health disparities; and, disproportionate levels of unemployment and underemployment).Rather than looking only back April 4, 1968 takes a sweeping 360-degree view of King's death-remembering all the toil, triumph, and tribulation that led to that fateful date while anticipating the ways in which the legacy of King's death will affect America's future.

Michael Eric Dyson re-examines the influence of the famous Civil Rights leader, and how his death changed America. Martin Luther King, Jr, the prophet for racial and economic justice in America, was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Earlier that day, he had ended his final public speech by saying "I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we as a people will get to the Promised Land."Now, forty years after his death, Michael Eric Dyson uses the assassination as a starting point for a comprehensive re-evaluation of the fate of America, specifically Black America, over the ensuing years. He ambitiously - and controversially - investigates the ways in the nation has made it to the Promised Land (the Civil Rights Bill of '64; the incredible number of black elected; the expanding black middle class and increased numbers of black entrepreneurs and CEOs) whilst shining a bright light on the many areas that still fall far short (racial profiling; police brutality; housing discrimination in the form of mortgage practices; health disparities; and, disproportionate levels of unemployment and underemployment).Rather than looking only back April 4, 1968 takes a sweeping 360-degree view of King's death-remembering all the toil, triumph, and tribulation that led to that fateful date while anticipating the ways in which the legacy of King's death will affect America's future.