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Breaking The Idols Of Ignorance: Admonition of the Soi-Distant Sufi / Sadr al-Din Shirazi (Mulla Sadra)

Availability: 2 in stock
Translated by M.Dasht Borzorgi & F. Asadi Amjad. Edited & Introduced by S.K Toussi.
£15.99

Are false mystics and impious sophists a modern phenomenon? Not according to Mulla Sadra Shirazi, the famous 17th century mystical philosopher who rebukes the pretentious by instructing the faithful on what it truly means to be pious. A brilliant synthesis of the Islamic philosophical, mystical, and theological traditions, this work stresses sincere virtues and spiritual exercises.

One of the greatest philosophers in Islamic history, Mulla Sadra (1571-1636) founded the transcendental school of philosophy (also known as al-hikmah al-muta‘aliyah). Born in Shiraz, Iran, he taught philosophy for many years under the auspices of the Safavid government before retiring to the village of Kahak for a fifteen-year retreat. During this time, he formulated his signature approach to philosophy, theology, hadith, and Qur’anic exegesis – an approach which remains influential to the present day.

Are false mystics and impious sophists a modern phenomenon? Not according to Mulla Sadra Shirazi, the famous 17th century mystical philosopher who rebukes the pretentious by instructing the faithful on what it truly means to be pious. A brilliant synthesis of the Islamic philosophical, mystical, and theological traditions, this work stresses sincere virtues and spiritual exercises.

One of the greatest philosophers in Islamic history, Mulla Sadra (1571-1636) founded the transcendental school of philosophy (also known as al-hikmah al-muta‘aliyah). Born in Shiraz, Iran, he taught philosophy for many years under the auspices of the Safavid government before retiring to the village of Kahak for a fifteen-year retreat. During this time, he formulated his signature approach to philosophy, theology, hadith, and Qur’anic exegesis – an approach which remains influential to the present day.