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(Im)migrations, Relations, and Identities: Negotiating Cultural Memory, Diaspora, and African (American) Identities / Chinwe L. Ezueh Okpalaoka

Availability: In stock
Black Studies and Critical Thinking
£28.50

The movement and dispersion of African ascendant peoples around the globe has been historically rooted in struggle and oppression. Whether through slavery, colonialism, or the economic fallout of both, we are always in a state of renegotiating and recreating identities wherever we have found ourselves in the Diaspora. In our displacement, contestations have arisen about which groups have the most legitimate claim to the continent of Africa. The issues that arise include naming (the names we bear and naming the feminist spirit in which Black women do work on behalf of each other), African identities (who is really an African?), cultural memory (how do the ways we remember and the things we remember shape who we are as African ascendant people?), and what methodologies best serve the work we do on behalf of African people. (Im)migrations, Relations, and Identities thoughtfully researches and discusses these issues.

Condition: Used - Like New

The movement and dispersion of African ascendant peoples around the globe has been historically rooted in struggle and oppression. Whether through slavery, colonialism, or the economic fallout of both, we are always in a state of renegotiating and recreating identities wherever we have found ourselves in the Diaspora. In our displacement, contestations have arisen about which groups have the most legitimate claim to the continent of Africa. The issues that arise include naming (the names we bear and naming the feminist spirit in which Black women do work on behalf of each other), African identities (who is really an African?), cultural memory (how do the ways we remember and the things we remember shape who we are as African ascendant people?), and what methodologies best serve the work we do on behalf of African people. (Im)migrations, Relations, and Identities thoughtfully researches and discusses these issues.

Condition: Used - Like New