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The AIDS Crisis: An Islamic Socio-Cultural Perspective / Malik Badri

Availability: In stock
Hardback
£25.00

This controversial book argues that Muslim societies should adopt an Islamically-oriented AIDS prevention campaign, rather than following the Western strategy. According to the author, the modern sexual revolution is a progeny of Western modernity, and AIDS is a natural consequence of the promiscuity propagated by this revolution. He believes that even if a cure or vaccine for AIDS is discovered, another outbreak of germs with new gene mutations cannot be avoided if the sexual revolution and modernity's attitude towards drugs are not radically changed. The author argues that countries with a different history, religious and spiritual orientation and divergent cultural heritage should not limit their prevention strategies to the "gospel" of condoms and clean syringes. Uncritical aping of this Western prevention model has resulted, he says, in the explosion of HIV infection in some African and Asian countries. AIDS prevention depends primarily on attitude change, and attitudes will not change unless prevention campaigns emerge from the culture and values of the society in question.

It is hoped that the main contributions of this book will be the delineation of the Islamic AIDS prevention strategy - an explanation of its nature, implementation methods, the ethical, social and political problems this may raise, and suggestions on how to cope with them. The author also hopes that choosing the Islamic rather than the Western AIDS prevention model in Muslim societies will pave the way for the use of Islamic problem-solving strategies in other areas as well.

This controversial book argues that Muslim societies should adopt an Islamically-oriented AIDS prevention campaign, rather than following the Western strategy. According to the author, the modern sexual revolution is a progeny of Western modernity, and AIDS is a natural consequence of the promiscuity propagated by this revolution. He believes that even if a cure or vaccine for AIDS is discovered, another outbreak of germs with new gene mutations cannot be avoided if the sexual revolution and modernity's attitude towards drugs are not radically changed. The author argues that countries with a different history, religious and spiritual orientation and divergent cultural heritage should not limit their prevention strategies to the "gospel" of condoms and clean syringes. Uncritical aping of this Western prevention model has resulted, he says, in the explosion of HIV infection in some African and Asian countries. AIDS prevention depends primarily on attitude change, and attitudes will not change unless prevention campaigns emerge from the culture and values of the society in question.

It is hoped that the main contributions of this book will be the delineation of the Islamic AIDS prevention strategy - an explanation of its nature, implementation methods, the ethical, social and political problems this may raise, and suggestions on how to cope with them. The author also hopes that choosing the Islamic rather than the Western AIDS prevention model in Muslim societies will pave the way for the use of Islamic problem-solving strategies in other areas as well.